How to Draft Your Fantasy Football Team. Don’t let fate decide the makeup of your fantasy
football team. Participate in a live draft with these tips. You will need Knowledge of your fantasy league’s
rules A computer with internet access and a “cheat sheet”. Several states officially bar all gambling,
including pools in which the organizer does not profit. Know your local laws before organizing a pool
involving money. Step 1. Know the basics. Most leagues require you to start eight to
10 players every Sunday: two or three running backs, a quarterback, two or three wide receivers,
a tight end, a kicker, and a defense. You’ll also choose a number of reserve players,
depending on your league. Step 2. On draft day, each participant takes turns
picking players until everyone’s roster is filled. In the weeks before the draft, read football
news to learn who’s hot and who’s not. Running backs and wide receivers are the most
coveted picks because teams must start at least two of each. Look at mock drafts online for up-to-the-minute
recommendations. Just because a player performed well last
season doesn’t mean he’ll do well this year. Consider his age, his team, lingering injuries,
whether he’s known for being erratic, and whether he’ll be a free agent at the end of
the season. Step 3. Once you’ve decided who you’d like to draft,
create a “cheat sheet” with names of your top draft picks and alternate picks for each
round – each turn you get to select someone. If you don’t have the first or second pick,
include several alternatives in case the players you want are taken. Step 4. Bring your cheat sheet to the draft. In the first two rounds, draft the best running
backs available: those with the potential to rush 100 yards per game and score in about
75 percent of the games you play them. If you’re deciding between two players at
the same position, take their home teams’ location into account, and err on the side
of those who play in warm weather or in domes. Step 5. With your third and fourth picks, draft the
two best wide receivers available. An outstanding receiver can be counted on
to catch for 50 to 60 yards per game and score a touchdown about 60 percent of the times
you play him. Step 6. Pick a quarterback in the fifth round. Solid quarterbacks usually throw for 100 to
150 yards per game and throw at least one touchdown. Step 7. Use your sixth and seventh picks to choose
another running back and wide receiver. Choose players who have different bye weeks
from your top two running backs and wide receivers. Step 8. With your next two picks, choose a tight end
and a backup QB. Pick someone who can start for your no. 1 quarterback on his bye week, or who can
stand in if your QB gets injured and has to miss two or three games. Step 9. The number of rounds varies from league to
league, but you should alternate choosing backup running backs, wide receivers, and
another tight end until you reach the last four rounds, when you’ll draft two kickers
and two defensive units. Step 10. Not satisfied with your draft? You can always propose trades to your fellow
team owners and use the waiver wire to sign new players. Did you know Fantasy football generates over
$1 billion annually in entry, online-service, and fantasy news fees.